Wacky Wednesday: My Starbucks’ Name

What does this say?

What on earth does this say?

I love my tall, nonfat-mocha-no whip (skinny mocha) from Starbucks.The least pleasant part of my ordering experience has to be when they ask me for my name. Yes, it’s a minor inconvenience–though sometimes I wonder why they do this when there are very few or no other people in line. Whenever I give them my first name, I inevitably get a puzzled look. And then, “Huh?” I got so tired of having my name mangled that I decided to use a nickname. Since I’ve had students that call me “Doc,” I figured that would be simple enough. What could be easier? I thought. Apparently, I was wrong, using this seems no easier.

I still get the response: “Huh?” And I say, “Doc–D-O-C.” The name on my cup of coffee has said “Dot” and also “Dock” before. But Saturday’s incarnation of my name was certainly new. See above.

Ok. I’m not really sure what this says, but I KNOW it doesn’t say “Doc.” It makes me wonder why people are having soooo much trouble with this name. Are the barristas unable to wrap their minds around my being a doctor of something? No, I choose to put a positive spin on this. They can’t believe someone so young and beautiful could have a doctorate. šŸ˜‰ And I accept their compliments.

So, 2 Dope Readers, what’s your Starbucks’ Name?

 

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Foto Friday: Sojourner Truth

In honor of Black History and Women’sĀ History months, 2 Dope Sistahs will be posting photos of our visits to historical sitesĀ on Foto Fridays. This week’s pictures are from Battle Creek, Michigan, where anti-slavery and women’s rights activist Sojourner Truth lived for more than twenty years.

Sojourner Truth carte de visite

Sojourner Truth carte de visite, sold to support herself.

Sojourner Truth (c. 1797-November 26, 1883) was born into slavery in Ulster County, New York at the end of the 18th century. Known as Isabella (or Isabella Baumfree/Bomefree), she freed herself (walked away) from slavery in 1826. An advocate for abolition and women’s rights, she changed her name to Sojourner Truth in 1843.Ā Truth’s narrative, The Narrative of Sojourner Truth, is available on the web and can be downloaded free of charge. Click here.

SojournerTruth1

Sojourner Truth Monument in Battle Creek, Michigan

12-foot statue of Sojourner Truth atĀ Monument Park

SojournerTruth3

Sojourner Truth’s signature, from April 1880, Sojourner Truth Monument

Sojourner Truth was unable to read and write, but the above is a representation of her signature.

SojournerTruth5

Headstone, Oak Hill Cemetery, Battle Creek, Michigan

Sojourner Truth is buried at the Oak Hill Cemetery. This stone marker was installed in 1946 by the Sojourner Truth Memorial Association. It replaced the original gravestone.

SojournerTruth6

Historical marker, Oak Hill Cemetery

Several members of Truth’s family are also buried in Oak Hill Cemetery.

Underground Railroad Memorial

Underground Railroad Memorial

Although it honors Harriet Tubman and other Underground Railroad “conductors” ratherĀ than Sojourner Truth, I decided to include the above picture. This 14-foot statue is also located in Battle Creek.

#DangerousBlackKids A Love Letter From Hood Feminists to Our Children

I’ve been trying to articulate my thoughts about the Jordan Davis case, but it’s extremely difficult to make these thoughts into words. This post by karnythia spoke to me.

hoodfeminism

We were on the phone yesterday, still reeling from yet another bizarre court case where a murdered child was on trial for existing in public. My oldest son is 14, taller than me, with a manā€™s voice and the over-sized hands and feet that come with imminent, but not yet reached physical maturity. To me, he is the embodiment of a roaming piece of my heart. I carried him, nursed him, and taught him. He will always be my baby. He is his fatherā€™s buddy. They communicate in a language of comics, art, video games, and jokes that are so very them. My youngest son adores his big brother, and while he is also my baby, I can see that like his older brother some day he will be a giant in my house. I worry for all of them in that way that you do when society says thatā€¦

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Foto Friday: Sojourner Truth

In honor of Black History Month, 2 Dope Sistahs will be posting pictures of our visits to historical sitesĀ on Foto Fridays. This week’s posts are from Battle Creek, Michigan, where Sojourner Truth lived for more than twenty years.

Sojourner Truth carte de visite

Sojourner Truth carte de visite, sold to support herself.

Sojourner Truth (c. 1797-November 26, 1883) was born into slavery in Ulster County, New York at the end of the 18th century. Known as Isabella (or Isabella Baumfree/Bomefree), she freed herself (walked away) from slavery in 1826. An advocate for abolition and women’s rights, she changed her name to Sojourner Truth in 1843.Ā Truth’s narrative, The Narrative of Sojourner Truth, is available on the web and can be downloaded free of charge. Click here.

SojournerTruth1

Sojourner Truth Monument in Battle Creek, Michigan

12-foot statue of Sojourner Truth atĀ Monument Park

SojournerTruth3

Sojourner Truth’s signature, from April 1880, Sojourner Truth Monument

Sojourner Truth was unable to read and write, but the above is a representation of her signature.

SojournerTruth5

Headstone, Oak Hill Cemetery, Battle Creek, Michigan

Sojourner Truth is buried at the Oak Hill Cemetery. This stone marker was installed in 1946 by the Sojourner Truth Memorial Association. It replaced the original gravestone.

SojournerTruth6

Historical marker, Oak Hill Cemetery

Several members of Truth’s family are also buried in Oak Hill Cemetery.

Underground Railroad Memorial

Underground Railroad Memorial

Although it honors Harriet Tubman and other Underground Railroad “conductors” ratherĀ than Sojourner Truth, I decided to include the above picture. This 14-foot statue is also located in Battle Creek.